Walking Boots

Scarpa Marmolada Trek Boot | First Look

New Scarpa lightweight aims to mix all-round walking and scrambling performance.

Scarpa’s new all-round walking come scrambling boot is aimed at being a sort of ultimate, all-round, technical lightweight walking weapon but with enough stiffness to kick butt on gnarly mountain scramble routes. On top of that, it’s also the first Scarpa boot to use the excellent OutDry waterproofing technology rather than Gore-Tex.


  • £199.99 / 1244g (pair size 43)
  • Schoeller fabric and suede upper
  • All-round rubber rand
  • OutDry waterproof technology
  • Vibram Mulaz S sole with Scarpa Pro mid-sole
  • Scarpa Sock Fit technology
  • Scarpa BQ last – wide but low volume forefoot

First Impressions

The trouble with mountain scrambles is that with a few exceptions you have to walk a fair way to get to them – or in the case of Tryfan’s North Ridge, to get out afterwards – and the trouble with full-on technical via ferrata come scrambling boots and shoes is that they tend not to be very comfortable for walking.

The new Marmolada Trek aims to bridge that gap by being either a light walking boot that’s also stff enough and rugged enough for scrambling or a scrambling boot that’s comfortable enough for all-day hill and mountain walking. Which seems like a pretty good idea to us.

It’s a decently light boot, a shade lighter in fact that Scarpa’s own R-Evo GTX with which it share the foot-hugging Sock Fit tongue arrangement, but has a rock-friendly, all-round rubber rand and what feels like a slightly stiffer unit all round plus the more rock-friendly Vibram Mulaz sole.

It also gets a new BQ last – nothing to do with DIY stores, it’s wide in the forefoot, but low volume, so it fits snugly and precisely, but for us anyway, without being uncomfortably tight. Should be good for precision on scrambly stuff and the  down-to-toe style lacing helps there too. A big of garden wall bouldering action was promising.

The high-cut ankle is nicely cushioned and comfortable, but we’ve found so far, it works best for walking with the top hooks left unused or at least slacked off. Worn like that and with the sole having a distinct rocker, they walk pretty well. Not as flexible underfoot as a lightweight mid, but there’s enough lengthways give in the forefoot to give a pretty comfortable ride.

The boot’s also the first Scarpa to use OutDry, a membrane that’s applied directly and bonded to the inside of the boot rather than being a separate floating sock liner. We’ve always liked it and it’s good to see the system being used in a full hill and mountain walking boot as opposed to a lightweight shoe.

The Marmolada is also available in a women’s specific version, the Marmolada Trek WMN with the same price.

Initial Verdict

If you’re in the market for a boot that also performs well on scrambles, but is also decently walkable, the Scarpa Marmolada Trek looks promising. Its snug fit and underfoot stiffness should work on smallish rock holds, but without rendering it an instrument of torture on the walk in or out.

It feels comfortable straight out of the box, is impressively light for what it does and has the bonus of being waterproof too. Our only minor quibble so far is that the EVA underfoot cushioning, which saves some of that weight, also tends to be less durable than the PU alternative.

More Information

Full details and spec at

The new boot use the elastic Sock Fit technology tongue for a foot-hugging fit.

All-round rand should give good protection from rock strike.

Heel fit is good with no lift for us. Underfoot cushioning is lightweight EVA.

The outsole is Vibram’s rock-orientated Mulaz S unit which should give good all-round grip on the rock and off it.

Closely-spaced, down-to-toe style lacing helps with a snug, precise forefoot fit.


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